Dana and Giving Opportunities

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Buddah statue at Duke GardensTriangle Insight Meditation Community offers our activities free of charge. An exception is for our retreats, where we charge the lowest fee possible to meet retreat facility expenses. The generosity of our community has been heart-warming in helping us sustain and reach farther with our activities. Some have asked for an opportunity to make a contribution online. Happily, now this possible.

We welcome online donations as a form of dana to support our weekly meditation sessions, our residential retreats, day-long retreats and occasional retreat workshops. Donations are also welcome for our scholarship fund to aid those whose financial circumstances make attending retreats difficult. Financial gifts may also be made in support of our building rental and material upkeep (cushions, chairs), for the support of our teachers, physical housing, or for whatever support of the Triangle Insight Meditation Community you prefer. If you choose this online donation option, when you complete your card information, please also note in the appropriate space how you want us to apply your contribution.

To Support the Triangle Insight Community

We trust the Buddha would approve of this modern version of the ancient practice, and that the same benefit of practicing dana may be realized. TIMC is approved by the IRS as a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt non-profit organization, and your contribution is tax-deductible to the full extent of the law. Thank you for your generosity.

Dana

If beings knew, as I know, the results of giving and sharing, they would not eat without having given, nor would the stain of miserliness overcome their minds. Even if it were their last bite, their last mouthful, they would not eat without having shared, if there were someone to receive their gift.    The Buddha

 

These words are as relevant today as in the Buddha’s lifetime, although the contemporary, Western form of Buddhist practice may look a bit different. In ancient India, and even now in certain Southeast Asian countries, the Buddha’s teachings are given freely by monastics to the lay people. In return, the recipients of such Dhamma (Pali) or Dharma (Sanskrit), would provide the “four requisites” to sustain the spiritual community:  food, clothing, shelter, and medicine.

Today, the practice of dana often takes the form of service work or financial contributions to communities that are continuing to practice the Buddha’s teachings. In addition to financial support, dana to our community might embody shramadana, another Pali word meaning to freely support with one’s own energy. There are many ways to donate one’s time and skills within the sangha now, and we always welcome new ideas. If you would like to explore this form of dana to support Triangle Insight, please contact us at [email protected].

All forms of generosity are gratefully received.